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Saturday, July 25, 2020 | History

2 edition of Application of nuclear localization sequences to non-viral gene delivery systems found in the catalog.

Application of nuclear localization sequences to non-viral gene delivery systems

K. Helen Bremner

Application of nuclear localization sequences to non-viral gene delivery systems

by K. Helen Bremner

  • 126 Want to read
  • 37 Currently reading

Published by University of Birmingham in Birmingham .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (Ph.D.) - University of Birmingham, CR UK Institute for Cancer Studies.

Statementby K. Helen Bremner.
The Physical Object
Pagination304 p. ;
Number of Pages304
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21688485M

This is a semi-private group. You are free to browse messages, but you must be a member of this group to post messages. Join This Group. The Sleeping Beauty transposon system is a synthetic DNA transposon designed to introduce precisely defined DNA sequences into the chromosomes of vertebrate animals for the purposes of introducing new traits and to discover new genes and their functions. It is a Tc1/mariner-type system, with the transposase resurrected from multiple inactive fish sequences.

Transfection is the process of deliberately introducing naked or purified nucleic acids into eukaryotic cells. It may also refer to other methods and cell types, although other terms are often preferred: "transformation" is typically used to describe non-viral DNA transfer in bacteria and non-animal eukaryotic cells, including plant animal cells, transfection is the preferred . To support the intracellular delivery of genetic cargo, nuclear localization signaling peptides and microtubule-associating sequences have been incorporated into nonviral gene delivery carriers; however, their use is still highly experimental, indicating that significantly more optimization is needed before the fully fledged use of these Cited by:

fragment peptides fused to an SV40 nuclear localization sig-nal deliver oligonuleotides that produce antisense effects in prostate and bladder carcinoma cells. Bioconjugate Chem, , ~ [14] Chan C K, Jans D A. Using nuclear targeting signals to enhance non-viral gene transfer. Immun Cell Biol, , ~Author: Yuan Zhi-Dong, Shen Xiao-Zhou, LI Jian-Fan, Liu Hai-Sheng. INTRODUCTION. Nuclear protein transport is central to normal and aberrant cellular development and physiology, as well as the infectious cycles of intracellular pathogens (Poon and Jans, ; Hearps and Jans, ).The ability to exploit the cellular factors involved in nuclear targeting is of great therapeutic value as it permits the design of vehicles for the efficient delivery of drugs.


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Application of nuclear localization sequences to non-viral gene delivery systems by K. Helen Bremner Download PDF EPUB FB2

Gene delivery systems include viral vectors and non-viral vectors. Viral vectors are the most effective, but their application is limited by their immunogenicity, oncogenicity and the small size of the DNA they can transport. Non-viral vectors are safer, of low cost, more reproducible and do not present DNA size by: This review briefly discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the current state-of-the-art gene delivery systems (viral and non-viral) and then provides an overview on the application of.

The present chapter will be focused on different gene delivery systems used in gene therapy approaches with the purpose of inserting into individual cells and/or tissues to treat diseases. By correcting genetic defects via genome manipulation, gene therapy can truly revolutionize medical intervention for treating monogenetic inherited/acquired Cited by: 3.

INTRODUCTION. Non-viral gene therapy is challenged by inefficient delivery at the level of intracellular processing. Several barriers have been described and studied, including failure to escape from vesicular structures (1,2), lysosomal degradation, enzymatic degradation in the cytosol (), entrapment in the highly viscous and crowded cytosol (4,5), lack of transport Cited by: The development of non-viral gene delivery systems is an important key to solving several problems occurring in viral gene delivery, such as endogenous virus.

release and translocation to the nucleus. Nuclear localization sequences (NLS) enhance gene delivery by increasing the uptake of plasmid DNA (pDNA) to the nucleus. So far, only monopartite NLS were analysed for non-viral gene delivery.

In this study, we examined the characteristics of a novel bipartite NLS like construct, namely NLS Ku A nuclear localization signal was non-covalently attached to DNA for the purpose of enhancing transfection efficiencies of non-viral gene carriers.

Psoralen, a nucleic acid-intercalating agent, was chemically attached to a signal by: Non-viral vectors. Gene delivery based on non-viral vectors has attracted much attention due to their universal application range and high safety level of delivery.

5 A number of nanoparticle delivery systems based on polymers and liposomes have been developed. Furthermore, physical approaches including, for example, electroporation and gene.

A nuclear localization signal or sequence (NLS) is an amino acid sequence that 'tags' a protein for import into the cell nucleus by nuclear lly, this signal consists of one or more short sequences of positively charged lysines or arginines exposed on the protein surface.

Different nuclear localized proteins may share the same NLS. Examples of molecules of CPPs include nucleic acids, liposomes, and drugs of low molecular weight. CPP can be directed into specific cell organelles by incorporating localization sequences into CPP sequences. For example, nuclear localization sequences are commonly used to guide CPP cargo into the nucleus.

For guidance into mitochondria, a. This gene therapy video tutorial focuses on different non viral gene delivery system to deliver normal copy of gene inside host tissue to cure genetic diseases. For more information, log on to.

To evaluate if introduction of DNA nuclear Targeting Sequences (DTS; i.e. recognition sequences for endogenous DNA-binding proteins) in plasmid DNA (pDNA) leads to increased transfection efficiency of non-viral gene delivery by virtue of enhanced nuclear import of the pDNA. A set of DTS was identified and cloned into EGFP-reporter plasmids controlled by Cited by: Strategies on the nuclear-targeted delivery of genes.

gene therapy requires the utilization of knowledge gained from the study of nuclear transport of viral DNA in non-viral gene delivery systems to conquer the barrier of the nuclear envelope (NE).

The nuclear localization and hydrophobicity of DEX contribute to its greater membrane Cited by:   Gene therapy, i.e., the expression in cells of genetic material with therapeutic activity, holds great promise for the treatment of human diseases.

A delivery vehicle (vector), of either viral or non-viral origin, must be used to carry the foreign gene into a cell.

Viral vectors take advantage of the facile integration of the gene of interest into the host and high probability of Cited by:   (An eBook reader can be a software application for use on a computer such as Microsoft's free Reader application, or a book-sized computer that is used solely as a reading device such as Nuvomedia's Rocket eBook.) Users can purchase an eBook on diskette or CD, but the most popular method of getting an eBook is to purchase a downloadable file of.

Gene therapy is manipulation in/of gene expression in specific cells/tissue to treat diseases. This manipulation is carried out by introducing exogenous nucleic acids, such as DNA or RNA, into the cell.

Because of their negative charge and considerable larger size, the delivery of these molecules, in general, should be mediated by gene vectors. Non-viral vectors, as promising Cited by: 3. Considerable effort has been devoted to the development of gene carriers over the years.

However, toxicity, immunogenicity, and low transfection efficiency are still major barriers. How to overcome these obstacles has become a burning question in gene delivery. In the present study, a simple cationic human serum albumin (CHSA)-based gene-delivery system containing Author: Guannan Guan, Baohui Song, Jie Zhang, Kang Chen, Haiyang Hu, Mingyue Wang, Dawei Chen.

A G Schatzlein, Non-viral vectors in cancer gene therapy: principles and progress, Anti-Cancer Drugs, 12, 4, (), (). Crossref Jue-Lon Shie and Chi-Chuan Tseng, A Nucleus-Localization-Deficient Mutant Serves as a Dominant-Negative Inhibitor of Gut-Enriched Krüppel-like Factor Function, Biochemical and Biophysical Research.

Helen Bremner has written: 'Application of nuclear localization sequences to non-viral gene delivery systems' Asked in Authors, Poets, and Playwrights. Devika S Manickam, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences at Duquesne University School of Pharmacy.

She completed her Bachelors in Chemical Engineering in (University of Madras, India) and received her Masters and PhD in Pharmaceutical Sciences ( and ) from Wayne State University (Detroit, MI). Non-viral peptide gene delivery strategies have sought inspiration from viruses in order to retain DNA delivering potency, but limit virulence.

This review summarizes the progression of peptide-based DNA delivery systems, from rudimentary beginnings to the recent development of sophisticated multi-functional vectors that comprise distinct Cited by: Efficient nuclear entry of exogenous DNA is one of the key factors toward gene therapy success with nonviral vectors.

To re-address the effects of a nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide attached directly to DNA, we prepared three dumbbell-shaped, green fluorescent protein (GFP)-encoding DNAs containing one or two NLS peptides.

The peptide was conjugated to the loop Cited by: Cross-linking peptides have been developed by inserting multiple Cys residues into a 20 amino acid condensing peptide that polymerizes through disulfide bond formation when bound to DNA resulting in small, highly stable DNA condensates that mediate efficient in vitro gene transfer [McKenzie et al.

() J. Biol. Chem.−]. In the present study, a minimal .